Tag Archives: Camp Guernsey

New sidewalk opens to connect Town of Guernsey and Camp Guernsey

The Town of Guernsey and Camp Guernsey are connected in a new way. On Oct. 22, a new sidewalk, the Guernsey Connector, officially opened. The ribbon cutting ceremony gathered Maj. Gen. Gregory Porter, Mayor Nick Paustian, Matt Allred, town planner, and numerous members of the Guernsey community and Camp Guernsey staff.

As the new addition to the project, the sidewalk connects the town and Camp. It runs west from the main gate, hand railing U.S. Highway 26, and ends at S. Colorado Ave. The sidewalk provides a safer way to travel to and from Camp Guernsey.

“It’ also a great example of how a community, such as Guernsey, its mayor council, Camp Guernsey, it’s accompaniment and Commander, and everyone else on the way up the ladder to Maj. Gen. Porter, is going to benefit from the ability to use a route from the camp to town or vice versa, without walking the fog line on the highway,” said Allred.

Porter gave credit to the engineers that worked hard on the sidewalk, as well as the Town of Guernsey.

“You made the community look nicer and safer, certainly for those of us that are on the Camp. It would have been so easy to say, ‘This is too tough to get done.’ But, you didn’t. And you kept going, you made a difference, and you probably saved some lives when it comes down to it,” Porter said.

The Camp Guernsey Connector, as it is officially named, is a piece of the Lucindy Rollins Road project.

“We have made huge strides,” said Allred, after explaining all that was left of the development plan.

The sidewalk is years in the making, as the project’s eighth phase. There is still work to be done, as there are at least three phases and a couple of bridges left.

“This took a lot of work,” said Porter. “It wouldn’t have happened if we didn’t push past the little roadblocks in the way. And nobody said you had to do it. From all of us, I just want to tell you thank you for all the support that Guernsey gives us.”

133rd Engineer Company completes recertification for reaction force training

The morning began bright and hot as Soldiers from the 133rd Engineer Company formed up and began classroom training outside for their National Guard Reaction Force recertification. The Wyoming Army National Guard partners with the Air National Guard’s 153rd Security Forces Squadron instructors in order to receive recertification.

NGRF falls under the National Guard Support to Civil Authorities, which is the process by which civil authorities can request military assistance. The NGRF is called upon by the governor in the event local law enforcement needs additional support for situations like crowd control or entry point security.

“These are things that need to be done in the event some sort of riot crisis or security issue arises that we need to resolve,” says Lt. Col. Cole Kelly, the Director of Military Support for the Joint Operations Center in the Wyoming Military Department.

Kelly signs the recertification for Soldiers, which occurs annually. Comprehensive NGRF training happens at least quarterly, but can be added to Mission Essential Tasks that are performed more often. The 133rd is the unit designated as the NGRF, and has been training every year for the last four years.

133rd Company Commander, 1st Lt. Eric Jacobs, has been with the unit in different capacities for the last six years.

“The whole time that the 133rd has had this unit, I’ve been involved with this training,” he says, whether as platoon leader, executive officer, or now the commander.

Instruction began with demonstration of different tactics for crowd control, all of them aimed to de-escalate tense situations. De-escalation involves the proper handling of non-lethal baton, shield and pepper spray equipment. The Air Guard instructors gave an overview demonstration of the equipment and then turned Soldiers over to stations for hands on experience.

Quarterly training might have set scenarios to run through, but for this day, Soldiers were given the task to come up with and run through their own scenarios.

“They are going to walk through a patrolling scenario and they are going to have to react to some items, such as an Improvised Explosive Device, or some other security situation. Whatever they decide to come up with,” Kelly says. “They’ll walk through different scenarios at separate stations.”

NGRF training benefits the state of Wyoming in that the unit provides support to local law enforcement when needed. Having a trained force ready, whether they are utilized or not, means they will be prepared if the time comes.

“I think it’s important the community sees this training and the National Guard Reaction Force and the Wyoming National Guard as a whole as a resource for them.” Jacobs goes on to say, “If we get called out, it’s not to police people up, it’s to protect Wyoming’s assets. Our most valuable asset is our people.”

Field artillery conducts live-fire exercise

The 2-300th Field Artillery Battalion (FAB) of the 115th Fires Brigade conducted a live-fire exercise with their high mobility artillery rocket systems (HIMARS) last Tuesday. The exercise is the culmination of their annual training in which they are required to qualify with the system every year. But what many may not know is the amount of preparation that goes on before the rockets even fire.

Before firing, they must adhere to strict safety procedures. Fire Direction Officer 2nd Lt. Matthew Buchanan creates and performs the missions for the launchers and also preforms safety analysis.

“I coordinate with range control and build a safety diagram for this range, from and to our desired target,” Buchanan says. “Before the launchers can shoot, they need to verify where they are pointed to make sure they are pointed in a safe direction.”

All of this can be coordinated from a specific location. The Tactical Operations Center (TOC) is the central area where all of the preparation and communication happens. You know when the rockets are about to fire if you are standing near the area as you will start to hear excited chatter over the radios and finally, “Fire when ready!”

Soldiers are given four rockets and are required to hit a target 9,500 meters away in order to qualify. Normally there are 16 HIMARS that fire four rockets each for qualification. This time, there are only four.

This was a different type of annual training for the 2-300th as most of the Soldiers are either deployed or just coming back from deployment, so the number of Soldiers at training is much lower. Because of this, they were able to fire the rest of the rockets, 66 in total, for extra practice between the four HIMARS that were used.

“This is to ensure we are lethal and capable of doing our missions on the battlefield,” says Battalion Operations Officer Maj. Casey Henry. “They’re going through all of their certification processes to ensure that we can deploy and go to war.”

This was the first time the unit fired in this particular location. The unit continued their live-fire training and finished at the end of the week.

820th Base Defense Group – Joined to Fight

This video was created to showcase the capabilities of the 820th Base Defense Group while completing a training exercise at Camp Guernsey Joint Training Center, Guernsey, Wyo. Airmen from the 105th Security Forces Squadron, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, NY., also participated in the training.

The 820th Base Defense Group is based at Moody Air Force Base, Ga., and is the Air Force’s sole unit organized, trained, and equipped to conduct the integrated base defense in high-threat areas. The mission of the group is to provide high-risk force protection and integrated base defense for expeditionary air forces. The Public Affairs Office collaborated with 820th BDG to create this video to highlight the lethality of their Airmen. What’s even cooler is that it took place in our neck of the woods! (U.S. Air National Guard video by Master Sgt. Jackie Marshall and Staff Sgt. Jon Alderman) 

 

Camp Guernsey turns 80 this year (Part one)


After years of training in poor conditions at Pole Mountain, the Wyoming National Guard decided to establish a temporary training camp at Guernsey and in June of 1938, accommodated its first of 80 “summer camps” at what is now an internationally known military training facility.
The Pole Mountain Camp, between Laramie and Cheyenne, was established in 1924 as a temporary National Guard camp, but the War Department would not fund the state for permanent improvements as it was deemed unsuitable for year-round and mobilization training.
Armed with the federal regulations and a desire to train his troops in proper conditions, Wyoming Adjutant General, Col. Rhodolph L. Esmay began lobbying the state government in 1931 to find a suitable location.
Seven years later, and a year prior to construction of any permanent buildings, a deal was worked out to surrender the Pole Mountain property in exchange for about 120 acres of state-owned land at Guernsey.
The site was attractive for its lower and warmer altitude, hilly terrain, abundant water supply, ample building materials, large areas of adjacent state-owned land and its proximity to a major railroad line. The Guard leased the area for the first camp, but already had its sights set on building it into a permanent post.


Esmay reported in April 1938, that an appropriations bill, sponsored by the War Department, was before Congress asking for $500,000 to begin construction of permanent facilities at the camp.
Meanwhile, Guard troops, under the supervision of Maj. C.G. Carroll, Quartermaster Corps and United States Property and Disbursing Officer, started building temporary facilities in preparation for the June encampment, and, as reported in the May 27 Guernsey Gazette, “had reached a point they could see over the hump. The electric light line is completed and the water system is finished.”
Long before operations security became a mantra for the military, troop movements and training schedules were available for all to see in the June 10 Gazette. “Cavalry horses will arrive today. Already some of the troop horses are here and the remainder will be on the picket line tonight. Tomorrow troops will arrive from various parts of the state. The first train will arrive Saturday morning at 8 o’clock; another at 1:50 P.M. another at 3:30 and another at 4:45.”
Some reports claimed there were upwards of 7,000 troops from other states and active units that joined the 620 Wyoming National Guard troops for mock battles during the two-week training period.
Under the command of Wyoming Gov. Leslie A. Miller, and Esmay, 31 soldiers comprised the state staff and state detachment. The staff, commanded by Carroll, included a medical officer, cavalry commanders from Laramie, Sheridan, Douglas, and Cheyenne, and a judge advocate general from Lovell. Five sergeants, four corporals and 13 privates made up the enlisted corps.
The 24th Cavalry Division and 58th Cavalry Brigade rounded out the staff with four officers, led by Col. Burke Sinclair, of Laramie.
Esmay commanded the 115th Cavalry, which was broken up into three squadrons. Troop A, from Lovell, and Troop B, from Sheridan, made up the 1st Squadron. The second included Troop E, from Torrington, and Troop F, from Laramie. The third was Troop I, from Lander. Most of the troops were led by two or three commissioned officers, and a dozen or so noncommissioned officers. The troops were rounded out with an average of 40 privates.
The troops arrived on camp June 11, and bivouacked in the area between the North Platte River and what is now the main cantonment where the Simulation Center and motor pools are today.
“The Cavalry is Camped at Guernsey,” read the headline in that week’s Gazette.
“For the first time in nearly half a century, cavalry troops are again silhouetted against the skyline on the hills near Old Fort Laramie,” the writer reported. “Riding the trails and traversing the terrain where so many years ago the cavalry carved its way while the nearby hills resounded to the warring beat of tom-toms.”
Editor’s note: Thanks to the Guernsey Gazette, Wyoming State Museum, University of Wyoming and Wikipedia for the use of materials used in this story. To retain the prevailing journalistic style, quotes used from the Guernsey Gazette are kept intact, however non-compliant they may be with Associated Press style.